Busy Week!

It’s been a busy week in the Studio.  I’ve had many prototype ideas going through my head for ages, and I finally had some time to experiment.  It’s always a bit tough for me to try out prototypes as I hate to waste the materials if it isn’t going to work out, and if they aren’t perfect, what to do with it?

camera 4

First up was a production run of toy cameras.  Made from Walnut for the body, and maple for the lens, these were a copy of a prototype I made (and gave away to my daughter).  I love the simplicity of these, just the basics of a real camera, viewfinder-lens-shutter button.  They are finished with a light coat of mineral oil, and are for sale in my Etsy Store, as well as in Patisserie La Toque in Wakefield, Quebec.

midcentchair2

Next up, a mid-century modern inspired chair.  Made from Baltic Birch plywood with padauk wedges in the through tenons.  I curved the back using bent lamination and the seat is covered with an upholstery grade corduroy.  I’d like to make these adult size, but for the prototype I decided to build it for a child so as to not use as much materials.  It’s now my daughters favourite chair!  After seeing me taking pictures of it, she yelled at me, “You’re not going to sell my chair are you???!!!”.  She’s hard to please, but I clearly won her over on this one.  These chairs will be custom order only as I don’t have the space to store finished chairs, and this will allow people to choose their upholstery colours.

photo 1-3

Last up was a pyramid shaped macaron tower.  Requested by Patisserie La Toque, how hard could a pyramid be to make?  Turns out this was the hardest project of the week.  Lots of angles made this very tricky, but with some glue, and a ton of brad nails and filler, it got completed on time and made the customer very happy.  Might think twice before making another pyramid though…

Next week I’ve got some canoe paddles on the go as well as a few more prototypes to try out, stay tuned!

Rosewood Studio, Week 6 – Bonus Week!

As week 5 drew to a close I asked Ron what we were doing in week 6.  He replied that normally week 6 is when we wrap up all the uncompleted parts of the various projects we have tackled over the past 5 weeks.  The only problem here is everything was finished.  That’s right, we were so far ahead of schedule that we had a full week of extra time.  Ron suggested I look over the 12 week course and if there were any skills/projects that I’d like to tackle I could do it in my final week.  I’ve always been interested in bending wood, and while I’ve had some experience with steam bending and laminating on a form, I had never done anything with a vacuum bag.  With that in mind, we tackled the “Bow Front Cabinet”.  A small wall hung cabinet with a bow front door.

To the untrained eye, the cabinet looks fairly simple.  It’s not too tall, only has two shelves, has a simple profile routed on top and bottom, and a curved door.  But it’s the curved door that throws everything for a loop.  While the top/bottom and sides are made from solid Mahogany, the front and back are made with plywood covered with Mahogany veneer.  I had to resaw the veneer myself and laminate it onto the plywood in order to hide it’s true makeup.  For the door front, two pieces of wiggle board (bendable plywood) were laminated with a piece of mahogany veneer in the centre.  This was all a very time consuming process (especially slicing the veneer on the bandsaw).  The laminations took a long time as well as each step had to setup for 3 hours in the vacuum bag before we could proceed to the next.

The final bit of trickiness was fitting the door to the cabinet and making sure that there was a small but constant gap around it on all sides.  This took a lot of finicky work with a hand plane but the end result was well worth it.

I managed to finish this project by Friday at lunch, so with an entire afternoon left, I decided to get some more time on the lathe and turn a simple bowl.  I picked a scrap piece of walnut that had incredible figure, but also happened to be full of cracks and checks.  It turned quite well considering the state of the original piece of wood.  I put a few quick coats of shellac on before packing up the car with all my projects and heading home.

Next week I’ll give a quick wrap up on all my thoughts about my time at Rosewood Studio.