Custom Walnut Biathlon Stock

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Cutsom stock #2 is now finished and off to a happy customer.  This one was also made of walnut but had a slightly different design as requested by the client.  Once again I’m really happy with the finish on these rifles and will use it more often on my other work.

Eric Stock 2013 2

 

Now that these two are done I can get to work on my backlog of projects!  It’s great to be busy but it would be nice if my list would get shorter and not longer once in awhile…

 

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Biathlon Walnut Rifle Stock

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Finally something to post about… Or more like finally some time to post what I’ve been working on….  I’ve made rifle stocks in the past, but not in the last couple of years.  Well orders have flooded in all of a sudden (when it rains it pours…).  Here is the first of 7.  It’s a custom stock designed for a local athlete who came just shy of a medal at last year’s national championships.  The design was mostly his suggestions, and they are loosely based on a German stock maker named Brislinger.

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I’m quite happy with how it turned out, and I tried out a new finish on it which I’m thrilled with the results of.  I spent a long time picking out the wood, and while you can’t see it from the pictures, there is some sap wood on the other side of the stock, giving it a nice two-toned look. Below is one of his first test groups… 98 out of 100 is an incredible score, and can’t be solely credited to the stock, but I’m also his coach, so I can take some of the credit…

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52 Create – Toy Wooden Stroller

Oh boy, I’ve had the idea for this one for months now.  When I first dreamt it up, I had no workshop/tools, but little did I know how much trouble this little beauty was going to cause me!!!  For those of you just joining in, this is week 3 in my 52 Create where I create 52 projects over 52 weeks.

 

First, let me tell you, wheels are not easy to come by.  When I was a kid, my dad and I built a soap box car.  We went to our local Canadian Tire and picked up some cheap wheels and by the end of the day I was ripping down the hill behind the Parliament buildings.  Fast forward 20 years and things are no longer so simple.  After visiting several stores, the best I could do were some snow blower wheels which were too heavy, and $10/wheel!!!!  You can buy a toy stroller in Paris for $7.  I should have bought one before we left and just ripped the wheels off…  Anyways, after some ebay searching I ended up ordering 4 scooter wheels from the states.  Total cost was $25 including shipping which still seems like a lot for what they are being used for, but in the end I’m happy how they turned out. My daughter loves strollers and at playgroup always finds one to tear around the room with.

 

The stroller is made out of Baltic Birch plywood, the dowels are from an old laundry hamper that a roomate broke/left behind.  I had my wife sew up the seat from some corduroy fabric (she also made the doll in the picture below).  In search of a safe kid friendly finish, I ended up using shellac.  It was a bit of a pain as the Lee Valley sells the flakes, but not the alcohol.  They also failed to tell me that although it recommends using Ethanol, that isn’t available in Alberta and so you need to use Methyl Hydrate instead.  If I had known this at the beginning, I might have saved myself a lot of driving around.  Shellac is of course food safe (used to coat M&M’s) and so is a great finish for kids objects. It’s also nice that it has no real smell to it, so I could apply the finish indoors.